Fully Equipped

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“We come marvelously equipped into a world offering a cornucopia of things to see, touch, smell, taste and hear, and we come with wiring to dream, remember, imagine,” Peter London writes in “No More Secondhand Art.”

Sometimes we forget how fully equipped we are — and how wondrous the world is. It’s easy to get lost in emails, constantly binging cell phones, inane conversations, day job drama, even self-defeating relationships.

Being more present continues to be my goal — and it’s a constant struggle. Occasionally I find myself texting while walking my dog, I stop, put the phone in my pocket, sigh and notice the bending necks of sunflowers, wilting knee-high daisies, gardens of succulents, strange alien-like plants. You can almost see the summer air lingering, seemingly saying the days are long, life is sweet but short.

I find the best thing has been plunging into my chilly apartment pool. I can’t think of anything but breath, light, temperature and movement.

The lovely poet Aimee Herman tells me that she takes time to stop along her journey and check to make sure all of her parts have shown up with her. I like her concept of inventory of self. What would that include, Aimee? Memories too?

I write to Lily, who now exploring Paris, that I want to be more authentic, spontaneous, brave and original. These are things we could practice daily at the Art Farm — but back in real life, I don’t know how to experiment with that, how to show it, put it into action.

Lily writes, “I think we all need the right context and the right place and the right people to allow those things to come out. You can’t do it in a vacuum.”

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6 thoughts on “Fully Equipped

  1. I love what you’re doing, I read all your blogs in one sitting and it’s got me thinking about my life and my music. I’ve realized I haven’t hung around an artist of any kind in years! Yet I keep chugging away at my song alone. There’s a drive or at least a desire to keep going, it’s easy. But living and interacting with humanity, for me is really difficult. I would like to live among artists again

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    • Thanks Mark! I was kind of doing the same thing with painting — isolating myself. I think it’s a good way to get work done, but recently I feel like interacting with other artist, whatever kind, is important for our emotional and mental well-being. That being said, I’m not sure how to find (or maybe start) the kind of community that I would want to exist. But at least it’s a start to realize that it might be something we want or need, right?

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